Contemplative Mind in Life

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A few links for Meditation practice

There are many types of meditation practice from many types of contemplative traditions. Some are rooted in the Buddhist contemplative tradition (Theravada or Mahayana) and others from traditions like Kabbalah in Judaism, and centering prayer originating in Christianity. There are many other contemplative practices, but it is those that stem from Buddhism that have been secularized and adapted into the Western medical model for a variety of clinical conditions and are simple enough for anyone who knows how to breathe.

For those interested in some simple guided meditations, try Sharon Salzberg‘s wonderful meditations HERE and a sample of the Metta Meditation HERE.

HERE is a guided anapanasati meditation (concentrative breath meditation) from Lisa Dale Miller

A simple breath meditation video with Michelle Gauthier HERE

Anapanasati with Gil Fronsdal available for playing and download HERE

UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center also has a few good links for guided meditation [Link]

UCSD‘s guided meditations straight from an MBSR course [Link]

21 Different Meditation practices from WithinInsight.com and SoundsTrue [Link]

More Insight meditation (which comes from the Theravada tradition) instruction from Ven. Pannyavaro HERE


I will be sure to post more links to guided meditations soon. Until then, if you have any questions or comments, let me know and I’ll do my best to answer you.

dv

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The Floating Feather Meditation Technique

The Floating Feather Meditation Technique – from the Dallas Yoga Examiner

Sit up straight, whether you’re on the floor or in a chair. Relax your face and shoulders. Take a long, deep breath and fill your belly and chest with air. As you exhale, make a soft “ffffffffff” sound, extending the outbreath as long as you can without straining. At the end of the exhalation, use the abdominals to push out the last bit of breath. Pause for two counts, then inhale again.

Repeat this pattern of breathing, establishing a slow count of four for the inhalation, pausing for two counts, a slow count of four for the exhalation (using the “ffffffff” sound), and a pause for two counts at the end of the exhale. Continue breathing this way, internalizing the rhythm until you no longer have to count.

Now envision a small white feather on the floor in front of you. As you inhale, imagine the feather rising off the floor a few inches, hovering as you pause, and descending as you exhale. It may be difficult at first to stay with the visualization, but don’t be hard on yourself. With time and practice, you’ll be able to hold the image in your mind for longer periods, adding detail and even imagining the feather rotating as it rises and falls. Stay with the meditation as long as you like, and try it again tomorrow.