Contemplative Mind in Life

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About

This Blog will serve to provide a cyber space for news dedicated to contemplative research in the cognitive neurosciences, clinical sciences, developmental, social and health psychology, and education. Please contact me at vago.dave@gmail.com if you have news that is relevant to the study of mind in life or contemplative sciences.

You can also see what type of research I am conducting personally and more contemplative science resources on my webpage: http://contemplativeneurosciences.com

DISCLAIMER: ALL PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES ON THIS SITE ARE FOR REFERENCE ONLY. THEY SHOULD NOT BE COPIED OR SOLD FOR ANY REASON.

The comments I am expressing are my own and do not represent the views or opinions of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its administration

David Vago, PhD is faculty at the Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory (FNL), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. He has held the position of Senior Research Coordinator for the Mind & Life Institute, a non-for-profit organization dedicated to fostering dialogue and research at the highest possible level between modern science and the great living contemplative traditions. He received his Bachelors Degree in Brain and Cognitive Sciences in 1997 from the University of Rochester. In 2005, David received his Ph.D. in Cognitive and Neural Sciences with a specialization in learning and memory from the department of Psychology, University of Utah. David’s research interests broadly focus on utilizing translational models to identify and characterize neurobiological substrates mediating psychopathology. In this context, David has been specifically focusing on investigating functional-anatomical brain networks supporting cultivated forms of awareness developed through mindfulness meditation training in order to clarify adaptive mind-brain-body interactions and their therapeutic relevance in psychiatric disorders. By revealing the neural circuitry and further identifying endophenotypes for pathophysiology, David hopes to better predict outcomes and potential targets for the development of biologically-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for those suffering with mental illness. Lastly, David is involved in designing multiple real-time functional neuroimaging studies that aim to use direct neurofeedback as a form of self-regulation to improve outcomes of anhedonia, dysthymia, depression, and addiction. David is an avid Vipassana and Dzogchen meditation and Ashtanga Yoga practitioner, and enjoys recreating in the outdoors.

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4 Comments

  1. Nisha says:

    Dear David,
    I just discovered this amazing web-site! Thank you for putting it up. I do have a question: what may be an appropriate outcome measure for the Buddha Relic tour? (Maitreya Project). Ordinary people visiting the tour experience unconditonal loving-kindness and healing of emotional and physical domains. Mindfulness may not be the best outcome measure. I am open to your thoughts.
    Many thanks again. Nisha
    njmanek@aol.com

    Like

  2. Nice website Vago! Very useful information. Is this your only site?

    Like

  3. Congratulations for this webpage, it is a very useful science and experience-based work, thanks a lot for sharing

    Like

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