Contemplative Mind in Life

Home » mind and life » Some Statistics RE: explosion of research in Contemplative Sciences

Some Statistics RE: explosion of research in Contemplative Sciences


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,557 other followers

RSS Wildmind

  • “Turn toward the fire, and enter, confident.” Dante Alighieri
    Today I’m going to talk about pain and how meditation can help you deal with it. You may not be experiencing pain today, but it’s something that happens to us all, and hopefully there will be something here that you find useful. Also what I’m going to say applies not just to physical but to emotional pain (hurt, anxiety, loneliness, etc.) so it’s relevant to […]

RSS Mindfulness and Depression

Twitter Updates

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.


Hi all,

Through my work with the Mind and Life Institute, I kept some statistics on the number and types of grants that were being awarded in the area of contemplative science. I also kept track of publication records. Here are some of those statistics (through 2010) to give you a sense of where this field is coming from and the steep slope indicating where it may be going.

Allocation of Grants from NIH - keyterm "meditation"

Allocation of Grants from NIH - keyterm "mindfulness"

Allocation of Grants from NIH - keyterm "yoga"

Peer-reviewed Publications (through 2010)

Peer-reviewed publications as referenced by PubMed (through 2010) is indicated. Pubmed is a division of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Health. It comprises more than 20 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites. The dotted line indicates when the Mind and Life Institute’s Summer Research Institute began in 2004.

NIH Grant funding (through 2010)

The graph above represents the number of grants awarded by the NIH through 2010. The RePorter database reports data and analyses of NIH research activities



  1. Interesting to see how research using the term “mindfulness” (vs. meditation and yoga) seems to be pulling away from the pack. not sure how i feel about that… Anyhow, great analysis. thanks for posting this!


  2. Chris OBrien says:


    Thanks for this post. The growth is indeed amazing. We have seen similar growth levels, particularly in publications and follow-on funding from major funders, in our Francisco J. Varela Award Program. Thanks for the work you do!

    Development and Communications Officer
    The Mind & Life Institute


  3. Karl LaRowe says:

    This is very exciting! Are you aware of any research utilizing Qigong?


    • yes Karl. There has been some good research on Qigong and other movement-based contemplative practices.
      one recent review is:
      Jahnke, R., L. Larkey, et al. (2010). “A comprehensive review of health benefits of qigong and tai chi.” Am J Health Pro [Link]
      and one by Cathy Kerr:
      Kerr, C. E., J. R. Shaw, et al. (2008). “Tactile acuity in experienced Tai Chi practitioners: evidence for use dependent plasticity as an effect of sensory-attentional training.” Exp Brain Res 188(2): 317-22. [Link]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: